Be Relevant – Stay Relevant

New post from KolormeHR: Be Relevant – Stay Relevant

“Still don’t know what I was waitin’ for, and my time was running’ wild……..ch ch changes…..” David Bowie.

Change. The word most people are sick of hearing. But change happens every day whether we like it or not. How we react and adapt (or not) to changes in our workplace not only show what we’re made of, but it either helps or hinders our success. To me, it’s not really about change per se, but rather continually moving forward in a fast-paced world. Unless we are completely oblivious to what goes on around us, we know change is coming. Why then do we act surprised when it gets here? When it touches us? Why then do we think maybe we should have done something different sooner, like learn a new skill or enhance a rusty one? Why then do we feel like we should have taken control of our career sooner?

Don’t let this be you. Take control of your career now. Take control of your learning. Make a plan and put that plan into action. While we may not always be able to alter the course the way we’d like, we have a better chance of staying relevant and marketable. Relevancy matters. We were hired because we had relevant skills for the job. And that’s great if we were hired recently. But what if we were hired 5, 10, 15, 20 years ago or more? Some of those skills still matter of course, and hopefully we’ve enhanced them. But  have we taken the time to develop new skills needed to help us stay relevant in a fast-changing world and help move our organizations forward? Or have we stayed in a bubble and not kept up on what’s happening in our respective industries and professions?

I’m celebrating 28 years at my firm on April 2nd. Longevity can be viewed as a great thing…..or not so great depending on your viewpoint. I didn’t envision being here that long, but many things kept me here. Executive leadership has consistently been strong. Personal and professional development has been encouraged and supported by my boss, and that is priceless to me. I continually sought to enhance and change job responsibilities as time marched on to keep stretching myself for personal job satisfaction.  And I learned….and kept learning by getting involved in industry associations, eventually moving into leadership at the local and national levels, completing a college degree, attaining professional certifications, soaking up information from publications and blogs, attending workshops, conferences, webinars, connecting with peers, and the list goes on. These things have not only helped me enhance already solid skills, but gain new skills that are relevant in today’s world. And it keeps me hungry for more.

There are so many resources at our fingertips that there is no excuse not to be ready when change comes knocking at the door. We cannot afford to rest on our laurels of yesterday because yesterday is gone. While not all change is fun, most of it can be if we reframe our thinking. As HR influencer and blogger Mary Faulkner says, “No matter how great change is, it will still seem like a wrecking ball.” By taking control of your career and staying relevant, you’ll be ready for it.

See Me, Hear Me, Hire Me

Bob (names have been changed to protect the innocent) arrived to the interview with boots laced around his neck. John continually mopped his forehead while sweating profusely during his interview. Tom abruptly stood up moments into his interview and announced he was going home because he missed his cat. In the middle of her interview, Sally pulled out family photos….many many photos. During his second interview with us, Jack revealed the prank he played at his law firm while working in the mail room (took a check that came in the mail outside and ran over it several times with his car). Harry told me about a nickname his co-workers gave him – Chester Chester the child molester. Sue had a lovely phone voice but that was overshadowed by the rats nest in her hair.

These are just a few memorable interviews I’ve conducted over the years. Yes, I smile when I think of these, but not for the reason you might think. I smile because when you’ve interviewed as much as I have, you learn that some candidates reveal who they are early on and others you find out about after the hire. I smile because even if someone isn’t right for our organization, they may be a great fit for someone else. I smile because no matter what candidates bring to the table or how they present themselves, they all have one thing in common. They put themselves out there applying for jobs. They took the steps to better their employment situation and lives. And that takes courage. They all deserve courtesy and respect and for HR professionals and hiring managers to see and hear them fully before making a hiring decision.

HR professionals and hiring managers have an awesome responsibility to find top talent for their organizations. We have the power to move people through the process … or not. We have the power to give hope to someone. We have the power to change someone’s life. We have the power to bring more diversity to our organizations. We cannot and should not abuse that power.

We abuse that power by feeling and acting superior to candidates. We abuse that power by looking for anything and everything to disqualify candidates. For example, in discussions with others with recruiting and hiring responsibilities, some have indicated that even one typo immediately puts that candidate in the “no” pile. It didn’t matter that they had a great cover letter and resume with solid skills. Some people can’t get beyond employment gaps as if those candidates are marked for life and don’t deserve a job. Have we forgotten the recession that cost lots of good people their jobs? Of course there are employment gaps people! Some candidates have had the audacity to take time out for families. Why are they not snapped up is beyond me.

I’m not saying every candidate is a fit for our organizations. I’m not saying that attention to detail doesn’t matter. I’m not saying that I don’t try to “find where the bodies are buried” because I’m responsible to my firm to be thoughtful and careful with who we bring in the door. But a typo here and there is not the end of the world for me. A letter or resume riddled with typos is another matter, but sometimes we just don’t catch everything. If a resume isn’t formatted the best, that’s not an automatic rejection from me (although it should be presented in an easy way to read). An employment gap doesn’t bring immediate suspicion because we’re in a different world from 20 years ago. To let some of these things rule out good candidates is short-sighted and not always in the best interest of our organizations.

Recruiting is fun and I enjoy it. I love representing our firm to candidates because it’s a fantastic firm. I love meeting with people and hearing their stories and admiring their skills. I love putting them at ease and having a great conversation. Not all candidates are right for our organizations. But all candidates deserve respect and courtesy. I encourage HR professionals and hiring managers to view the recruiting process through the lens of the candidate. I challenge us to apply for jobs so we can experience first-hand what candidates experience today, and change our procedures if applicable. It’s not only the right thing to do, but we never know when we’ll be on the other side of the desk. And that can be more humbling than anything.

Down Conference Memory Lane

Desperately running through the Minneapolis airport to catch a flight, realizing three to a room wasn’t feasible in Chicago, being driven on a bicycle cart through the streets of San Diego dressed in Village People headgear, playing washboards in New Orleans, trying to pay a toll for the car behind us only to end up looking like something from One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest in Florida, being chastised by citizens in Seattle for jaywalking, learning that your friends totally had your back in Las Vegas, visiting Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, suffering through one operating elevator in Manhattan, exploring a haunted hotel in Chicago (and seeing a ghost😳), being drenched in torrential rains in D.C.,  and using a towel under my door as a ‘snake guard’ in Arizona. These are only a handful of memories from conferences I’ve attended. And of course, plenty of learning occurred too🙂.

It’s fun seeing the exciting hype SHRM18 bloggers are writing about leading up to the SHRM conference, and ALA’s annual conference is right around the corner. I’m heading to Ultimate Software’s Ultimate Connections conference next week. Conference attendance has been a big part of my life and has enriched my career more than I can adequately portray.  My first conference was an HR/Payroll conference and it hooked me. I remember preparing a recap of sessions attended and what I got out of them for my bosses after the first two conferences. They told me the recaps were nice but not necessary – they understood the value of learning.

The support of my ambitions and continual learning from them and my firm has been priceless. It has led to tremendous personal and professional growth and increased job satisfaction. It has provided me opportunities to get involved in leadership and make connections across the globe. It has made me a better leader and employee and it can do the same for you if you want it enough.

While I have plenty of fun at conferences, I have never taken my firm’s investment in me for granted. I get full days of sessions in, and keep meal and transportation costs reasonable. My rule of thumb is to not order or pay for something I wouldn’t spend my own money on.

If you’re considering whether a conference is worth it, my advice is just do it, understanding that you will get out of it what you put into it. Expect to learn something and you will. Expect to meet people and keep those connections going and you will. Expect that no matter your experience level, there’s always an idea or practice you can bring back to your organization, and you will. Expect to have fun and you will.

Now go do it.

Amazing Things Happen When You Say Yes

About a year ago, I said yes to a LinkedIn invitation to connect. That’s not a big deal as I accept a lot of LI invites. Little did I know how rewarding and meaningful this connection would turn out to be. And to think I almost missed this opportunity.

At first glance, I didn’t see the benefit of connecting with a young man from Nigeria with an engineering education. After all, what could we possibly have in common? As I started to hit the “x” to decline the invite, something told me to stop and read his profile so I did. Turns out he was interested in the human resources profession. I accepted the invitation and have been thankful ever since.

What started out as a mentor/mentee relationship has turned into a friendship and mutual respect for each other. Ayobami Okediji is starting out in his HR career and soaks up everything he can about the human resource profession. We communicate regularly and Ayobami asks thoughtful questions and is appreciative of my advice (let’s face it, it’s flattering when someone seeks and respects your opinion).  I’m also learning a lot from him. I’m learning about the very different job cultures in our countries, and Ayobami encourages me in my career and with this blog.

Today, I sent Ayobami Steve Browne’s book HR On Purpose: Developing Deliberate People Passion knowing he’ll appreciate and love it as much as I do. And it’s fitting because we both have a passion for HR and this book is all about that. If I had hit the “x” to this LI invite, I would have truly missed out. Think twice before you hit the “x” next time you receive an invite. Amazing things happen when you say yes.

Amazing Things Happen When You Say Yes

About a year ago, I said yes to a LinkedIn invitation to connect. That’s not a big deal as I accept a lot of LI invites. Little did I know how rewarding and meaningful this connection would turn out to be. And to think I almost missed this opportunity.

At first glance, I didn’t see the benefit of connecting with a young man from Nigeria with an engineering education. After all, what could we possibly have in common? As I started to hit the “x” to decline the invite, something told me to stop and read his profile so I did. Turns out he was interested in the human resources profession. I accepted the invitation and have been thankful ever since.

What started out as a mentor/mentee relationship has turned into a friendship and mutual respect for each other. Ayobami Okediji is starting out in his HR career and soaks up everything he can about the human resource profession. We communicate regularly and Ayobami asks thoughtful questions and is appreciative of my advice (let’s face it, it’s flattering when someone seeks and respects your opinion).  I’m also learning a lot from him. I’m learning about the very different job cultures in our countries, and Ayobami encourages me in my career and with this blog.

Today, I sent Ayobami Steve Browne’s book HR On Purpose: Developing Deliberate People Passion knowing he’ll appreciate and love it as much as I do. And it’s fitting because we both have a passion for HR and this book is all about that. If I had hit the “x” to this LI invite, I would have truly missed out. Think twice before you hit the “x” next time you receive an invite. Amazing things happen when you say yes.

Jumping In!

I’m not very adventurous. You won’t find me jumping out of an airplane or cliff diving. Ever. You won’t find me scuba diving or swimming with dolphins. Ever. You won’t find me on a ski lift in the mountains or touring caves. Ever. But you WILL find me way outside of my comfort zone and jumping in with no life jacket to the world of blogging. At least for one blog. I committed to #hrtribe that I would write one blog this year and if I didn’t like it, I was done.

So there you have it. This is my first blog and I have no idea what I’m doing. But as with life and the wonderful world of HR, I’ll learn as I go. And I won’t fail or fall flat on my face. You know why? Because HR bloggers support each other and celebrate each other’s successes. We have each other’s backs. And that’s all I need to put myself out there.

Who am I to think I can pull off a blog? I’m a baby boomer HR professional (sounds better than “seasoned”) who has the good fortune of working at a great law firm in human resources. I’ve got experiences and opinions to share that may resonate with others. As a continual learner, I am excited and refreshed by the ever changing world of HR and I’m happy to be part of it. So this first blog (there will be at least one more) is dedicated to #hrtribe #hrbloggers who have braved and paved the way.

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